New York Archaeology

Coastal Camp Ecofacts- Queens, NY

Coastal Camp Ecofacts- Queens, NY

Excerpt- Archaeological sites from this early period are most associated with exploiting the land for seasonal food sources such as coastal spring fishing camps, fall open air hunting camps, and shellfish collecting stations. Native American women in sites such as the one now at College Point, Queens, […]

Colonial Dutch Ceramics- Fort Orange, NY

Colonial Dutch Ceramics- Fort Orange, NY

Excerpt- The New York State Museum has announced the acquisition of over 100,000 archaeological artifacts from Fort Orange and Schuyler Flatts, documenting Dutch and early English settlement of the Albany area in the 17th century. Archaeological excavations in the early 1970s under the direction of Dr. […]

18th C. Stemware- Fort Edward, NY

18th C. Stemware- Fort Edward, NY

Excerpt- Every summer from 1755 to 1759, Fort Edward was the base of operations for more than 15,000 British soldiers and officers in support of Fort William Henry in Lake George, N.Y., about 14 miles north, during the French and Indian War. One of the goals this […]

Dorney Pipe Stem- Abolitionist Site, NY

Dorney Pipe Stem- Abolitionist Site, NY

Excerpt- Among the artifacts unearthed in this patch of Arbor Hill: shards of china. Chunks of ceramics. A rusty steel disc. A little white stem from a clay pipe manufactured by Peter Dorney. A swamp-root kidney cure produced by a doctor in Binghamton. Such morsels […]

Lithic Flakes- Binghamton U Archaeological Field School, NY

Lithic Flakes- Binghamton U Archaeological Field School, NY

Posted by Binghamton University Archaeological Field School on Wednesday, June 21, 2017 Excerpt- Some of the most common artifacts found so far on the site include coal, charcoal, brick, and chert flakes, which are leftover lithic flakes from the process of stone tool creation. Other students […]

Chianti Wine Bottle- New York, NY

Chianti Wine Bottle- New York, NY

Intact bottles can brighten up a rainy day #urbanarchaeology #bottles A post shared by Chrysalis Archaeology (@chrysalis.bklyn) on Apr 6, 2017 at 10:17am PDT